Critical Differences Between Cooking Oils


Critical Differences Between Cooking Oils

Oils play a massive role in the cooking process. Not only do they grease a surface, preventing food from sticking and burning, but they also influence the health and flavor of the dishes you create.

 

At Y.O. Ranch Steakhouse, we believe in using healthy cooking oils as the backbone of our menu optionsFor the chefs at home, we want to show you that there’s so much more to cooking oils than grabbing the cheapest bottle off the store shelf.  Chances are you’ve wound up burning something simply because you opted for a cooking oil that can’t withstand certain cooking temperatures.  We’re going to look at which oils work best for which method of cooking. 

 

Health Impact of Cooking Oils

Before we learn how to cook with oils like a Dallas steakhouse, let’s examine the healthiest oils you can cook with. The right oils reduce free radicals in your body and create heart-healthy eating.

 

While you may think that cooking healthy is expensive, the truth is that standard oils like canola and olive oil can have health benefits worth applauding.

 

Canola oil offers less saturated trans fats, reduces cholesterol levels, and even helps reduce skin blemishes and acne.

 

However, if you want to delve deeper into reducing saturated fats and making your food healthier, there are other oils that you should consider, according to the American Heart Association:

  • Corn Oil
  • Peanut Oil
  • Avocado Oil
  • Peanut Oil
  • Sunflower Oil
  • Soybean Oil

Which Cooking Oil Works Best?

We could go on all day about the health benefits of cooking oils. As a steakhouse, we love to get into the meat of things (pun intended!). There is more than one way to cook a perfect steak using oils. Find out what cooking oil cooks best by appliance.

Stovetop Requires High Smoke Point

Stovetop cooking, like searing and pan-frying, requires oils with a high smoke point to get the job done well. 

 

Vegetable oil is the jack of all trades regarding cooking and is perfect for frying Texas favorites like chicken-fried steak and other breaded foods. Want to cook at high temps and not burn your food? Vegetable oil is your pan’s best friend!

 

When it comes to frying on your stovetop, peanut oil is another excellent option for a higher smoke point. However, this oil has a higher fat percentage than vegetable oils but still comes in lower than other “healthy” favorites like coconut oil.

 

Best Oil for Stir-Frying

Stir-fried vegetables should be a staple at any dinner table. Extra virgin olive oil has a smoke point of 375 degrees Fahrenheit and is perfect for frying more delicate foods like veggies and thin-cut meats.

 

As a bonus tip, if you want to add a little extra flavor to your stir-fry, sesame oil is always an excellent go-to!  Since stir-frying requires high-heat cooking, sesame oil is best suited for cooking at higher temperatures. 

Best Cooking Oils for the Oven

Whether you’re baking sweets or love roasted meat and vegetables, your oven probably gets a lot of use. Ensure the oils you use are quality and communicate with your appliance and any food you bake! Olive oils and vegetable oil will work, but why stick to the standard? As a self-made chef, never fear experimentation!

 

Unrefined Coconut Oil

Unrefined coconut oil has a low heat threshold of 350 degrees Fahrenheit. This makes it the perfect oil to rub on a baking dish with delicate fillings. Unrefined coconut oil is recommended for baking desserts like cookies, pies, and cakes. It will ensure your sweet tooth is satiated without an unwanted burnt aftertaste.

 

Grapeseed Oil

Are you roasting vegetables? Much like cooking on a pan, you need an oil that cooks at medium heat levels and won’t add too much char to your food. Grapeseed oil has a slightly lower smoke point at 420 degrees than other oils but is excellent for getting foods roasted well. It adds an extra layer of flavor that will make your family crave your roasted side dishes.

 

Palm Oil

Cooking foods with high-fat content, like a perfectly marbleized steak, can be tricky. You need the right oil for stress, and palm oil is a perfect choice. It has a high smoke point (450 degrees Fahrenheit) and gets meat roasted to taste. Keep in mind that the fat content in palm oil is higher. So, if you’re on a health kick, stick to vegetables or EVOO and pull out this special oil on special occasions.

 

Best Oil to Use on the Grill

Grills are an appliance that naturally generates high heat. Thus, you’ll want oils that can keep your food tasting great with just enough char.

 

High-Heat Cooking Oils

When grilling, you want a high-temperature oil that doesn’t interfere with your flavor palate. We recommend the following oils for that last grill this summer:

 

  • Avocado oil is an efficient oil. It has one of the highest smoke points for grilling and cooks at temperatures around 520 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Vegetable, canola, and olive oil are excellent go-tos for greasing your grilling plates. Each cooks well at high temperatures and has a neutral flavor that lets your steak, chicken, or veggies speak for themselves. 
  • Are you looking for a healthier grilling oil? Safflower and sesame seed oils are rich in antioxidants and healthy fatty acids, making them a great way to boost the healthfulness of your cooking. They also fare well in the extreme heat your grill puts out!

Taste the Difference 

There you have it!  Whether it’s frying, baking or grilling, we hope you heed our advice and choose the best cooking oil based on the temperature and method of cooking your food.

Sometimes you need to experience cooking with proper oils for yourself to understand the difference between basic and “ooh la la”!

Y.O. Ranch Steakhouse invites you to sit at our table before summer ends. Our seats fill up quickly, so make your reservation today!